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General Medical Biology

General Medical Biology

General Medical Biology

The scientists in General Medical Biology are working to cure some immensely challenging diseases: autoimmune, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, kidney, liver and others.
Each effort begins with one simple goal: Improve human health. We are motivated to embrace novel, often risky, endeavors. We go for the “high hanging fruit,” taking on projects that many research organizations might reject as too difficult.
General Medical Biology
General Medical Biology
General Medical Biology

Some of these high-risk efforts will succeed, bringing tremendous benefit to patients around the world. Others will fail, but even the failures have value, helping illuminate the intricacies of human biology.

From there, researchers go where the science takes them, unhindered by artificial barriers. This environment creates an intensely collaborative culture. Biologists, engineers, chemists and many other specialists share ideas and expertise and create new systems and approaches to solve problems and capture unknown biology.

These collaborations allow researchers to study disease in novel ways. In some cases, the group is working on comprehensive solutions to improve care for multiple conditions.

As an example, the group is also working on drugs that can upregulate native progenitor cells, boosting the body's innate ability to regenerate damaged tissue. This would be a huge advance, creating a platform that could heal hearts, livers, kidneys and other organs. Projects like these aren't easy, but they can redefine how medicine is practiced.

From top to bottom, the department believes in big ideas, big solutions and big science. They're not satisfied with incremental advances that may modulate a disease – they're going after cures.